Chaplain

Mrs. Kandy Harkin is the Chaplain at St. Ignatius of Loyola Secondary School. The Chaplain is available to support and guide all members of the school community on their faith journey. In order to do this the Chaplain provides opportunities for prayer, sacraments and celebrations of the Eucharist, staff and student retreats, pastoral counselling, resource for student projects, prayer services and class discussion.

By calling forth the talents and gifts of students and staff, the Chaplain encourages a strong sense of Christian community in our school. Fostering both a sense of caring and of social justice, the Chaplain shares in what makes our school a special experience for all who are a part of St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Secondary.  Students are welcome to drop by the Chaplain’s office at any time.

St. Ignatius Prayer

Lent 2019 begins on Wednesday March 6th

What is Lent?

The season of Lent is a Catholic liturgical season consisting of forty days of fasting, prayer, and penitence beginning at Ash Wednesday and concluding at sundown on Holy Thursday. The official liturgical color for the season of Lent is violet. Lent begins on March 6th.

10 Tips for Making the Lenten Season More Meaningful

Slow Down – Set aside 10 minutes a day for silent prayer or meditation. It will revitalize your body and your spirit.

Read a good book – You could choose the life of a saint, a spiritual how-to, an inspirational book or one of the pope’s new books.

Be kind – Go out of your way to do something nice for someone else every day.

Get involved – Attend a Lenten lecture or spiritual program.

Volunteer at your parish – Whether it’s the parish fish fry, cleaning the church or helping with the food drive, it will give you a chance to help others.

Reach out – Invite an inactive Catholic to come with you to receive ashes on Ash Wednesday.

Pray – Especially for people you don’t like and for people who don’t like you.

Tune out – Turn off the media devices and spend quality time talking with family members or friends.

Clean out closets – Donate gently used items to the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

Donate – Pick a Catholic mission and decide how you can help by sending money, clothing or supplies.

Lenten Regulations

The Catholic Church, in an attempt to help Catholics do at least a minimum during Lent, asks all Catholics to fast and abstain from meat on certain days. Fasting means to limit food to one full meal a day with the possibility of two smaller meals (not adding up to a full meal) as needed. Abstinence means not eating meat, although fish is allowed. Catholics are required to observe all days of fasting and abstinence which is one of the precepts of the Church.

Those 14 years of age or older are to abstain from meat on Ash Wednesday and all the Fridays of Lent. Catholics between the ages of 16 and 59 are also to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday. They may eat one full meal on these days, and two small meals to maintain strength. The two small meals together must not equal the size of one full meal. If one’s work or health make it inadvisable to fast or abstain from meat, they are not obligated to do so. This includes mental health: Fasting may be harmful for someone who struggles with an eating disorder. Such a person might do an alternate penance on the days of fasting. Pregnant and nursing women are exempt from the fast.

Lenten Prayer

God of goodness and mercy,

Hear my prayer as I begin this Lenten journey with you. Let me be honest with myself as I look into my heart and soul, noticing the times I turn away from you. Guide me as I humbly seek to repent and return to your love.

May humility guide my efforts to be reconciled with you and live forever in your abundant grace.

Transform me this Lent, heavenly Father. Give me the strength to commit myself to grow closer to you each day.

Amen.