Chaplain

Mrs. Kandy Harkin is the Chaplain at St. Ignatius of Loyola Secondary School. The Chaplain is available to support and guide all members of the school community on their faith journey. In order to do this the Chaplain provides opportunities for prayer, sacraments and celebrations of the Eucharist, staff and student retreats, pastoral counselling, resource for student projects, prayer services and class discussion.

By calling forth the talents and gifts of students and staff, the Chaplain encourages a strong sense of Christian community in our school. Fostering both a sense of caring and of social justice, the Chaplain shares in what makes our school a special experience for all who are a part of St. Ignatius of Loyola Catholic Secondary.  Students are welcome to drop by the Chaplain’s office at any time.

St. Ignatius Prayer

FEBRUARY 2018

 The Feasts on the General Roman Calendar celebrated during the month of February are:

January 30 – Feb. 1: Fourth Week in Ordinary Time

January 31 – Saint John Bosco

Feb 2. The Presentation of the Lord, Feast Day

Feb 3. Saint Blaise; Saint Ansgar,

Feb 4. Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Feb 6. Paul Miki and Companions, Memorial

Feb 8. Saint Jerome Emiliani; Saint Josephine Bakhita

Feb 10. Saint Scholastica

Feb 11: Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Feb 14. February 14th – ASH WEDNESDAY

Feb. 17 The Seven Holy Founders of the Servite Order

Feb. 18: First Sunday of Lent

Feb 21. Saint Peter Damian

Feb 22. The Chair of Saint Peter the Apostle; Feast Day

Feb 23. Saint Polycarp

February 25 – Second Sunday of Lent

Feb 26: Eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

LENT BEGINS ON WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 14th:

What is Lent?

The Lent fast is a Christian tradition, but many non-believers also take part.

On Ash Wednesday, people over the globe give up certain foods or habits to improve their health or demonstrate self-restraint.

It lasts for 40 days until Easter, but this is without Sundays being included in the amount (if there were counted it would be 46 days).

When does Lent 2018 start and end?

This year, Lent starts on February 14 which is also known as Ash Wednesday and the day after Shrove Tuesday.

The day of Lent changes every year in accordance to the lunar calendar, similar to Easter Sunday.

Lent is a 40-day fast, and ran up until the Thursday before Easter Sunday, March 29, which is known as Holy Thursday, or Maundy Thursday – after this date those observing it could indulge once more!

What is Ash Wednesday?

Ash Wednesday is officially the start of Lent but the exact date changes each year depending upon when Easter falls.

To mark the day, clergy all over the world burn palm from the previous year’s Palm Sunday services to create ash.

This is then rubbed across people’s foreheads in the shape of the cross as they are reminded “For dust you are and to dust you shall return”.

The ceremony is meant to show followers that their lives are short and they must live them to the fullest.

This sees Lent begin and it continues until the Thursday before Easter weekend.

Why is Lent for 40 days and what is its meaning?

The Lent period reflects when Jesus fasted and suffered in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights, before he started his ministry.

According to the Bible, he was tempted by Satan during this time, but each time he managed to refuse his temptations.

People follow Jesus’ example and give up vices in a bid to grow closer to God as Easter approaches.

Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day occurs the day before Lent begins, symbolising when Christians would eat up foods such as milk and eggs before fasting.

Where does the tradition of fasting come from?

Lent and fasting go hand in hand for many in the Christian church.

Many followers abstain from certain food or temptations, following Jesus’ 40-day fast in the desert in preparation for his public ministry.

Fasting has been practiced for centuries within a number of religions and culture, and is featured within Jewish culture in the Old Testament.

For example, Queen Esther asks the Jewish nation to come together in prayer and fasting, and Christians often combine the two practices nowadays.

Source: LOYOLA PRESS

 

If Lent is 40 days, why are there 46 days between Ash Wednesday and Easter?

Over the course of history the season of preparation for Easter Sunday has ranged from one day (in the first century) to 44 (today in the Roman church).

By : David Philippart  Catholic Apostolate Centre

ARTICLE YOUR FAITH

“The 40 days of Lent” has always been more of a metaphor than a literal count. Over the course of history the season of preparation for Easter Sunday has ranged from one day (in the first century) to 44 (today in the Roman church). Officially since 1970, Lent begins on Ash Wednesday and ends at sunset on Holy Thursday.

Already at the Council of Nicea in 325 the bishops spoke of the quadragesima paschae (Latin for “40 days before Easter”) as the well-established custom. At that time Lent began on the sixth Sunday before Easter and ended at dusk on Holy Thursday—40 days. But the council also forbade fasting, kneeling, and any other acts of sorrow and penance on Sundays, even in Lent. So only 34 of the 40 days were for fasting.

Since Jesus fasted and prayed for 40 days after his Baptism, Christians in the fifth century wanted literally 40 days of penance before Easter. The first step was to add Good Friday and Holy Saturday, the “paschal fast,” to make 36 fasting days.

The second step occurred over the course of the next few centuries in Rome. In addition to baptizing new Christians at Easter, the practice of welcoming back on Holy Thursday those who were baptized but who had committed serious sins became popular. Just as those to be baptized entered into final and intense preparation during Lent, those to be reconciled were expected to do likewise. But the first day of Lent—a Sunday—was already full, with Eucharist, a penitential procession through the city, and the rite of election for those to be baptized.

So those to be reconciled on Holy Thursday gathered on the Wednesday before the first Sunday of Lent. Wednesday (along with Friday) was already a day of fasting throughout the year, so it was appropriate to gather the penitents on that day. Borrowing a sacred sign from the scriptures, the bishop sprinkled ashes on the heads of the penitents, which they wore (without washing) until Holy Thursday as a sign of their sorrow.

This sacred sign was so attractive that even those who were not in a state of serious sin began to ask for ashes on the Wednesday before Lent. By the 11th century the pope recommended to all the bishops that ashes be distributed to anyone who sought them on that day, which became, of course, Ash Wednesday.

Here then, were four more days of fasting and penance: Ash Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday before the first Sunday of Lent, bringing the total to 40. So today, while the season of Lent (Ash Wednesday to Holy Thursday) is technically 44 days, the number of days for penance and fasting before Easter is still 40: 44 days minus 6 Sundays equals 38, plus Good Friday and Holy Saturday equals 40.

 

SAINT VALENTINE PRAYER

I said a Valentine prayer for you
and asked the Lord above
to fill your heart and bless your soul
With the precious gift of love.

I asked Him for sincere love
The kind that’s meant to stay
Just like the generous love
You give to those you touch each day.

I prayed for love from family
And from every cherished friend
Then I asked the Lord to give you
His love that knows no end.

Source: (Author unknown)